lacigreen:

skunkbear:

It seems like the title of an onion article, but it’s actually very serious. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that hurricanes with feminine names killed significantly more people than hurricanes with masculine names.  The authors looked at several decades of hurricane deaths (excluding extreme outliers like Katrina and Audrey) and posed a question: 

Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations?

 According to their study, the answer is a big yes.

Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action.

In other words, because of some deep-seated perceptions of gender, people are less afraid of hurricanes with feminine names. And that means they are less likely to evacuate.

damn.  looks like mother nature is coming for your sexist ass.

Reblogged from lacigreen

voldesnorts:

harlequin-dreams:

womxxn:

We went to this burger place for lunch (turned out to be a drag bar which was shitty in other ways) but the walls were papered with rolling stones covers and it just really becomes obvious when you see lots of magazine covers next to each other that men are treated as people and women are treated as objects.

THIS PROVES MY POINT SO HARD IT SMASHES YOU IN THE TEETH

GOSH DARN IT I HOPE YOU FEEL THE SLAP IN YOUR FACE

Reblogged from lacigreen

terrakion:

policymic:

Dreamworks is doing something even Pixar hasn’t tried: A black female heroine

DreamWorks Animation Studios has announced the addition of a black female heroine (gasp!) to its repertoire of white dogs, green ogres, snails, Neanderthals, pandas, white people and Antz. In doing so, it joins an elite club consisting of … well, nobody.
Not one major Hollywood studio has released a 3D animated feature starring a black character.
Read more | Follow policymic


SHES VOICED BY RIHANNA

terrakion:

policymic:

Dreamworks is doing something even Pixar hasn’t tried: A black female heroine

DreamWorks Animation Studios has announced the addition of a black female heroine (gasp!) to its repertoire of white dogs, green ogres, snails, Neanderthals, pandas, white people and Antz. In doing so, it joins an elite club consisting of … well, nobody.

Not one major Hollywood studio has released a 3D animated feature starring a black character.

Read more | Follow policymic

SHES VOICED BY RIHANNA

Reblogged from lacigreen

Don’t give me that look.
My success is your
success.
My losses are your
losses.
We may not be
the same person,
but we bleed the same blood.
Don’t roll your eyes at me.
Don’t tell me I don’t understand.
Don’t you see?
I am as red
and as tired as you are.
I have been sighing for just as long,
hoping somebody’s ears would
perk up.
I’m listening.
I heard you.
And your fight is my fight.
To The Girls Who Tell Me They’re Not Feminists | Lora Mathis (via lora-mathis)

princess-slay-ya:

My most popular post has received a lot of arguments lately, so I figured I’d respond to the most common points people bring up.

Sources:

Carrie Fisher on her costumes 

what supermodels wear in hell

 on Padme’s wardrobe 

to get a general gist of Queen Jamillia’s and Oola’s screen time, here are the scripts for Attack of the Clones (Jamillia is in 359 word scene) and Return of the Jedi (Oola is in scenes that add up to 275 words)

Star Wars Bechedel Test results  here

Reblogged from princess-slay-ya

The 14th-century Arab traveler, Ibn Battuta, described women’s position in the Golden Horde as a unique phenomenon.

"I have seen in this country the wonder of their exalting the women, for they have a higher position than men."

Turkish women of all social strata were not restricted to the indoors and “did not wear veils”.

Women in lower levels of society held the occupation of brokers in the market and exhibited their wealth through their extravagant dress, carriages and entourage of servants and maids, while their husbands wore sheepskin hats and coats and looked as if they were their servants.

Women of the upper class were treated courteously by their husbands and participated in public festivals and ceremonies.

The queens, the Khan’s four wives, took an active part in court councils and ceremonies, and accompanied him on his journeys.

During the ceremonies there was no separation between and men and women as was the custom in Middle East Islamic countries.

Shajar al-Durr: A Case of Female Sultanate in Medieval Islam by Amalia Levanoni

worldhistoryconnected

(via medieval-women)